Indiana Company Making Device That Helps With Speech for Parkinson’s Patients

A start-up company in Lafayette, IN is making news because of their new technology that assists Parkinson’s patients with their speech. The Indiana company, SpeechVive Inc. recently won a grant to develop a telehealth platform that allows speech pathologists to remotely program a hearing-aid like device for patients who cannot travel to the SpeechVive office.

Students interested in speech pathology should look to hear more from SpeechVive in the coming months as the company grows.

Jessica Huber, at left, an associate professor in Purdue's Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences, and graduate student Meghan Moran demonstrate a new technology developed in Huber's lab that helps Parkinson's patients overcome the tendency to speak too quietly. The system works by playing a recording of ambient sound, which resembles the noisy chatter of a restaurant full of patrons. A sensor placed on the neck detects that the person has begun to speak and tells the device to play the babble through an earpiece worn by the patient. Patients also wear a mask and sensors in elastic bands placed around the ribcage to precisely record respiratory, laryngeal and articulatory data. (Purdue University photo/Andrew Hancock)

Jessica Huber, at left, an associate professor in Purdue’s Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences, and graduate student Meghan Moran demonstrate a new technology developed in Huber’s lab that helps Parkinson’s patients overcome the tendency to speak too quietly. The system works by playing a recording of ambient sound, which resembles the noisy chatter of a restaurant full of patrons. A sensor placed on the neck detects that the person has begun to speak and tells the device to play the babble through an earpiece worn by the patient. Patients also wear a mask and sensors in elastic bands placed around the ribcage to precisely record respiratory, laryngeal and articulatory data. (Purdue University photo/Andrew Hancock)

By Staci McFall
Staci McFall Associate Director, Employer Relations Staci McFall